Scientists Add Kidney Damage To The List of Mobile Phone Ills Part 1

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Mobile phones were at the centre of a new health scare last night after claims they can seriously damage the heart and kidneys.

Earlier reports have already linked their use to brain tumours, headaches and premature ageing. Now scientists sat exposure to the phones’ low-level radiation causes red blood cells to leak haemoglobin. The build-up of haemoglobin, which carries oxygen around the body, can lead to heart disease and kidney stones.

The findings will heighten alarm over the safety of mobile phones which are used by more than 13 million people in Britain. In the latest research, scientists exposed samples of blood to varying degrees of microwave radiation for periods between ten to 60 hours.

Even at lower levels than those emitted by mobile phones, the cells leaked haemoglobin. Professor Edward Tuddenham, a haemotologist at the Imperial College Medical School based in Hammersmith Hospital, West London, said the findings were worrying and he wanted to see the study followed up. ‘The accumulation of haemoglobin in the body could result in heart disease or kidney stones,’ he warned.

The Department of Health said yesterday that the new study – carried out at the European Research Institute for Electronic Components in Bucharest – would be examined by a Government-appointed committee due to report on phone safety next year.

However, the Cambridge based consumer group Powerwatch said with evidence of the risks growing the government needed to do more.

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Kidney trouble speeds up heart disease

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His research and teaching, extend from the physiology and biochemistry of photosynthesis and photorespiration through the biological effects of electromagnetically treated water to the electrophysiology of plants. He also designed an experiment for the Anglo-Russian ‘Juno’ space mission and is now a member of the Life Sciences Advisory Group for the European Space Agency.

As well as ‘regular’ scientific papers, mainly on plant electrophysiology, he has written several popular science feature articles for the New Scientist on such diverse subjects as ‘Why Trees are Green’ and ‘The Cell Electric’ (on the evolution of plant and animal action potentials and the origin of the nervous system).

His interest in the biological effects of electromagnetic fields dates back over 30 years but has only recently come to fruition with the publication of a new theory that explains many of their seemingly weird effects in simple physico-chemical terms. It was first published (mainly in relation to plants) in Plant Electrophysiology Theory and Methods, Ed AG Volkov (Springer 2006). This was followed by an Internet publication in 2007 (which can be viewed on this site) entitled ‘The Biological Effects of Weak Electromagnetic Fields’, which deals with their effects on humans and animals and, in particular, the dangers from mobile phones.

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Cardiac problems can also trigger kidney destruction, study finds

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Martin Weatherall’s Letter to Daily Planet Regarding Wireless Dangers

Mast-victims talked to Dr Goldsworthy at the Radiation Research Conference in London and he gave a brilliant interview where he explains how weak electromagnetic fields damage living cells.

Click the source link at the bottom to go to the “resources” section and listen to the interview.

About Dr. Goldsworthy:

Andrew Goldsworthy is an Honorary Lecturer in Biology at Imperial College London. He retired from full time teaching in 2004 but still gives occasional lectures there in specialist subjects such as food irradiation and the (exorbitant) energy cost of modern food production.

He was born just before the Second World War and, after a grammar school education in Wales, obtained a First Class Honours Degree in Botany, followed by a PhD at the University College of Swansea. He then took a lecturing post at Imperial College London where, apart from a short secondment to work in agricultural research and a sabbatical in the USA, he has been ever since.

At Imperial, he acquired a reputation among students for explaining complex subjects in simple terms, for ‘out of the box’ thinking, and for spicing his courses with unusual lectures such as those on space biology and the scientific basis of acupuncture.

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